How Cosmetic Surgery Changes One’s Looks

How Cosmetic Surgery Changes One’s Looks

cosmeticsurgeryFor the name of aesthetics and refinement, some people consider undergoing cosmetic surgery and they are willing to pay the high price. While the cost of surgery is comparable to city buildings, some people opt to undergo the procedure for them to look younger or better.

In 2008, cosmetic surgery has gone another milestone with the use of technology. In fact, people can change the way how they look in just one click of a mouse, according to Daily Mail UK. For those who are scared of knives being used to remove eyebags, remove wrinkles, and sculpt their jawlines, a website called “Lift Magic” was aimed at prospective cosmetic surgery clients who wanted to know their post-surgery look. The site was reported to show clients how they would look after some alterations on the properties of their facial features.

In the view of plastic surgeons, cosmetic plastic surgery could be a perfect way for refining a flawed body part while boosting one’s self-esteem; however, the procedure is “no primrose path” to a beautiful existence. Plastic surgeon Patrick Hudson told How Stuff Works that it was true that plastic surgery could profoundly affect how people thought and relate to the world around them, but it was real surgery, which was not like getting a hair cut.

Dr. Sarah Davis suggested on her blog on Patient that one should be holistically well prior to a plastic surgery, since it is permanent. She wrote that the first thing to do if one thought he might have qualified for cosmetic surgery was to talk to his general practitioner (GP). If the GP agreed that one might have qualified, he would be referred to a plastic surgeon or to a psychologist if it was the appearance that was causing mental distress. Davis added that the surgeon or psychologist would in turn assess the client and write a confirmatory report as to whether the client had enough physical, psychological, and social benefit to justify surgery.

According to Huffington Post blogger Elizabeth Dosoretz, the face was much like a signature, as it had a distinct look and shape. Dosoretz added that while people’s signature change or “mature” over time, their faces and bodies were still their own unique proof of identity. The Huffington Post blogger also shared about her friend who had decided to have plastic surgery on her face and breasts. She said that while her friend had been a happy person, the latter felt that her eyes had appeared small, droopy, and depressed. According to Dosoretz, her friend had had a clear mental image of what she had looked like; however, she had been continuously surprised when she had seen herself in the mirror.

For Dosoretz, it was not much about what one looked like on the outside in the end and it was definitely not about how others saw the person. According to her, the most important identity was the one a person created.

Clients upload a digital photograph of their face to the website, prior to revealing what they would like to change. There are catalogues of selections, such as eyebrow lifts, tear trough enhancements, nose reduction, lip augmentation, and jaw restoration. After the necessary alterations have been put, users just click the “show me” butto to see an image of the new and enhanced face. The site can also display the before and after photos for the client to check and point out the differences.

Modiface, a Canadian face visualization company, runs “Lift Magic.” According to the company spokesperson Andrew Collin, the main benefit of the Lift Magic site was that it allowed people to see a “retouched version” of their photo in literally seconds. He added that the site did not involve tedious manual editing and calibration and users were allowed to select from the choices, press a button, and witness the result. For Collin, using Lift Magic was fun, easy, and virtually effortless.