4 Anti-Allergy Foods for Instant Allergy Relief

4 Anti-Allergy Foods for Instant Allergy Relief


It could be the dust or the pollen. It could be the dander or the freshly painted wall. It could be a combination of all these triggers. Either way, allergies can be easily remedied.

Keep a stock of the following foods in your pantry for instant relief from allergy.

Yogurt and anything probiotics

Probiotics have anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects. According to Mind Body Green, one Italian study found that toddlers with allergic rhinitis who drank fermented milk with Lactobacillus casei for 12 months suffer less allergic episodes than those who didn’t.

Additionally, a study published in the British Journal of Dermatology showed that mothers who drank probiotic-fortified reduce the chances of their babies from developing eczema, a skin condition related to allergies. So, if you are prone to allergy, make yogurt a part of daily diet. Other probiotic-rich foods you can try are miso soup, sauekraut (fermented cabbage), kefir, kombucha (fermented tea), pickles, and kimchi.


“Allergies are an inflammatory reaction triggered by over-acidity,” said Dr. Susan Lark of The Lark Letter. Therefore, the more alkaline your body is, the better your immune function is and the more resistant you are to allergens. Lemons are great at bringing your body’s acidity level to a balance as they can make water more alkaline when added pure and fresh to H2O. They can also do well in boosting your immunity as they are loaded with vitamin C and many other anti-oxidants. Just squeeze a piece of lemon to pitcher of water and drink this mixture throughout the day.

Raw Honey

Especially if you are suffering from spring allergy due to pollen, eating raw honey is good for you. For one thing, raw honey (particularly one made locally in your neighborhood) contains bee pollen collected from the same flowers that trigger your allergy – building your immunity to it as a result.

Green Tea

A 2002 Japanese study featured in Science Daily revealed that green tea can boost the immune system and prevent allergic reactions. Kyushu University researchers found that green tea’s compound, methylated epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), is capable of blocking cell receptors involved in producing allergic response in rodents that were given the compound orally.

The researchers believe it may have the same effect in humans. So, once the bouts of sneezing, coughing and watery eyes that are characteristics of cold and allergies begin, go brew yourself some tea.